Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Field Trip: Visit to Yoki Farm

Last post, I shared our experience and photos regarding Angel’s field trip to Paradizoo. After Paradizoo, we went to Yoki Farm in Cavite.


Yoki farm

Yoki farm grows vegetables and herbs using hydroponics. Hydroponics is a method of growing plants using nutrient-rich water solution. No soil is needed. To make the trip really educational, a personnel in the farm demonstrated to the kids how the hydroponics system works. Well, I learned something, I’m just not sure if Angel or her preschool mates did.

Basic hydroponics set up
Basically, the first step is to prepare the substrate (if I remember right, it was made of saw dust or kusot and sand) in a small cup, where the vegetable seeds are planted. After the seeds grow (takes several days), the plants are transferred to the set  up shown in the picture above until they are full-grown and ready for harvest (about 40 days?) Notice the container of water with pump below the table, that contains the nutrient-rich solution that is distributed to the plants. The plants get nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus (again if I remember this info right) from the supplied water.

After the demo, we took a tour of the farm. They have the vegetable garden of all kinds of lettuce and the orchids garden. I was not able to take a picture of the vegetable garden, because I thought that we will go inside. Instead, we just passed by it. Good thing I took a shot of the growing orchids along the way.

Growing orchids
They also have a mini aviary. There were different kinds of birds – parrot, macaw, etc. I forgot to look at the name of this bird that I took a picture of. Maybe it’s a baby Macaw.

Yellow bird
The last part of the tour is the viewing of the statues and antique memorabilia collection of the farm owner. It must have numbered thousands of pieces, because it occupied a big area. The most notable is the giant golden Buddha. Here are photos showing a sampling of their huge collection.

Giant golden buddha
Angel and the reading kids

Angel meets horsey
Bronze collection

Egyptian statue

Is this Confucius?

Green jade Chinese vessel
Jade Chinese vessel


Last Supper wood

Last Supper ceramics
It was awesome to look at all those collections. I just wish that the owner could add some info or trivia on each piece or set of the collection, just to help visitors especially the kids know more about the objects.

We had our lunch in the mess hall of Yoki Farm. Also, there were fresh produce being sold for a cheap price. Three different kinds of lettuce — Iceberg, Romaine and the purple lettuce, I forgot the name — are sold for P20 per pack (with 2 -3 heads of lettuce).  We bought some to take home as pasalubong.

How much is the entrance fee? We came as a group, so I personally do not know. But internet research tells me it’s P100 per person and free for small kids. You can check out Yoki Farm’s Google+ page for inquiries.

8 comments:

Aby said...

It my first time to know about yoki farm, sounds a nice place to visit

Michi said...

I haven’t visited the place yet because I’m not sure if my son would appreciate the plants. hehehe! Malapit lang ba sa Paradizoo?

Chin chin said...

Michi, parang malapit lang sa Paradizoo ang Yoki farm, because the trip did not really take long. It’s probably not recommended for very young kids.

Mayen said...

That Buddha is massive. Looks like a good place to visit.

ceemee said...

Interesting place! I didn’t know statues are part of a farm. The gate of Yoki looks like it’s promising a magical place.

Chin chin said...

I think the owner loves to collect a lot of items and decided to share them with others.

Nilyn Matugas said...

Field trips are one of the things that I look forward to when my baby starts going to school. I think it’s a great way to bond with your kids and his/her classmates and their parents. Plus it’s very educational.

Dominique Goh said...

That’s a really interesting place that Angel visited on a field trip. Unusual to see so many different statues in a farm.